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8.4.17 3DPrinting.com
"New Study Results Show That 3D Printed Surgical Models Can Equal Major Cost and Time Savings"
Having personal experience with the typically agonizing time spent in a waiting room while a loved one undergoes surgery, I am a big fan of anything that safely reduces the amount of time patients have to spend on an operating table, including 3D printed surgical models for training and planning purposes. Medical models, specifically patient-specific ones, allow surgeons to get their eyes, and their hands, on the organ or body part they?ll be operating on ahead of time, which lets them plan out exactly what they need to do during the surgery.

8.4.17 Digital Trends
"Transparent 'Window Into the Brain' Lets Sound Waves Through the Skull"
A transparent skull implant is designed to make ultrasound brain surgery easier. The words "hole in the head," as in "[insert organization] needs another reorganization like a hole in the head" is a colorful way of describing something that there is absolutely no requirement for. But sometimes a hole in the head is necessary -- and researchers from the U.S. and Mexico want to help deliver it. With that in mind, they invented a skull implant that serves as a literal window into the brain -- with the goal of making ultrasound brain surgery easier.

8.3.17 Semi Engineering
"Using Machine Learning In EDA"
Machine learning is beginning to have an impact on the EDA tools business, cutting the cost of designs by allowing tools to suggest solutions to common problems that would take design teams weeks or even months to work through.This reduces the cost of designs.

8.3.17 Education Dive
"In 2 years, ransomware raked in an estimated $25M"
Education is among the top industries targeted by ransomware operators, largely due to the sensitive nature of its data and its critical importance to day-to-day operations. Other popular targets have included government entities and healthcare organizations. Data analytics software may, however, be able to solve campus' ransomware woes. One such solution, Splunk Insights for Ransomware, seeks to streamline the process of addressing an attack, monitoring networks to prevent potential attacks before they can succeed.

8.3.17 New Atlas
"Hip 3D-printed models save time in surgery"
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is the most common hip disorder in children aged 9 to 16, affecting about 11 in 100,000 children in the US annually. It's treated via surgery to reshape the head of the femur, and needless to say - the quicker that the operation can be completed, the better. That's why scientists from the University of California San Diego have been experimentally using 3D-printed models of patients' hips to reduce surgery time by approximately 25 percent.

8.2.17 Discover
"Treating the Brain With Ultrasound and a Ceramic 'Window'"
One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is very simple -- access. The brain is encased in the bony cranium, and many regions are buried beneath layers of brain tissue, making any intrusion potentially dangerous. Physically probing into the brain is also extremely difficult, and because you can't just cut it open and sew it back up afterward as you might another organ, surgeons would benefit from less invasive methods. Now they might have one. With a special kind of ceramic, researchers have created a small "window" that can be implanted in the skull to allow for ultrasound therapies.

8.2.17 New Atlas
"Skylight in the skull lets the ultrasound in"
Ultrasound is already utilized to treat brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, plus it can be used to kill cancer cells and to dissolve stroke-causing blood clots. Unfortunately, however, the thickness and density of the skull absorbs or reflects much of the ultrasound before it reaches the brain, making treatments less effective than they would be otherwise. That said, a solution may be on the way, in the form of what's being called a "window to the brain."

8.2.17 News Medical Life Sciences
"3D-printed models help shorten surgery time for common hip disorder in children"
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group.

8.2.17 Medical Press
"Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery times"
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group. The team, which includes bioengineers from the UC San Diego and physicians from Rady Children's Hospital, detailed their findings in a recent issue of the Journal of Children's Orthopaedics.

8.2.17 Scicasts
"Ceramic Implant Material Developed that Will Expand Use of Ultrasound to Treat Brain Disorders and Cancers"
Ultrasound brain surgery has enormous potential for the treatment of neurological diseases and cancers, but getting sound waves through the skull and into the brain is no easy task. To address this problem, a team of researchers has developed a ceramic skull implant through which doctors can deliver ultrasound treatments on demand and on a recurring basis.

7.28.17 Quartz
"Hackers have lost their favorite bitcoin laundering service after an arrest in Greece"
The arrest of a Russian man named Alexander Vinnik in Greece on Wednesday could disrupt the operations of one of the world's largest bitcoin exchanges, which is also a top money laundering destination for online criminals. Vinnik's arrest could also help solve the mystery behind the 650,000 missing bitcoin from the infamous Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange in 2014. The US Department of Justice has indicted Vinnik for money laundering and other financial crimes as the alleged operator of the cryptocurrency exchange BTC-E.

7.28.17 Electronics 360
"Video: UC San Diego Robotics Team Enters Japan's RoboCup Competition"
Scientists from the University of California, San Diego, are for the first time taking part in the international RoboCup @ Home competition. During the past three months, the team has been testing algorithms to train a Toyota Human Support Robot (HSR) to complete two tasks: Picking up and putting away groceries; and helping someone to carry groceries from their car to their home. The goal of the RoboCup @ Home competition is to test a robot's ability to perform everyday tasks, help people around the house and establish robot-human communication and interaction.

7.27.17 Fortune
"Ransomware Cost Surpasses $25 Million Mark"
Companies and individuals have paid more than $25 million over the past two years to try to get their computer data back from hackers who hijacked it. This is according to new research by Google about the phenomenon. Ransomware attacks use software that infects a target's computers and encrypts all the files so that the victims lose access. The perpetrators hold onto the key for decrypting the data until they get their demanded payment, or ransom, which victims typically pay using bitcoin or some other cryptocurrency that is difficult or impossible to trace.

7.27.17 NBC San Diego
"Your Roomba May Be Mapping Your Home and Collecting Data It Could Sell"
Roombas and iRobots are modern gadgets to help clean your house, but are they collecting data that could be sold to major companies? Many iRobots collect data about your house as they work, like where furniture and walls are located in the building. This is to help the Roomba learn the best ways to clean your house without bumping into the couch, for example. "Over time the robot becomes smarter and knows which places it needs to clean up more around your home," said Henrik Christensen, director of the Contextual Robotics Institute and a professor of computer science at UC San Diego.

7.26.17 Business Insider
"Ransomware has made more than $25 million from its victims over 2 years, Google study finds"
Malware can be a highly profitable business. Ransomware, malicious software that encrypts victims' data and demands a pay-off in order to unlock it, has made more than $25 million (£19.1 million) in bounties over the last two years. That's the finding of a study from researchers at Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandom School of Engineering that was seen by The Verge's Russell Brandom.

7.26.17 c|net
"Malware now comes with customer service"
Hackers behind some of the most notorious ransomware around are taking some hints from legit Wall Street companies. Malware strains like Locky and Cerber helped make ransomware a $25 million industry in 2016 and its operators are starting to operate like conventional corporations with "customer" service staff and outsourced resources, researchers explained Wednesday at Black Hat. Ransomware has devastated hospitals, universities, banks, and essentially any computer network with weak security over the last 10 yrs, but attacks have become even more prevalent as infection rates and payments grow.

7.25.17 10News - ABC San Diego
"Smart Glove Turns Sign Language Into Text"
Engineers at UC San Diego have developed a glove that wirelessly translates sign language letters into text. They built the prototype for less than $100. What makes this glove unique is that it uses stretchable and printable electronics.

7.25.17 Forbes
"Petya Ransomwar Victims Can Now Recover Their Files For Free"
Internet users who have fallen victims to the aggressive Petya ransomware attacks over the past year are in luck. There is now a free tool that will allow them to decrypt their files if they hang onto them since then. Petya is a ransomware program that first appeared in March 2016. It surprised security researchers at the time because unlike other file-encrypting ransomware programs that targeted specific file types such as pictures and documents, Petya damaged entire hard disk drives, leaving computers unable to boot.

7.25.17 Yahoo! Finance
"Ransomware has made more than $25 million from its victims over 2 years, Google study finds"
Malware can be a highly profitable business. Ransomware, malicious software that encrypts victims' data and demands a pay-off in order to unlock it, has made more than $US25 million (£19.1 million) in bounties over the last two years. That's the finding of a study from researchers at Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandom School of Engineering that was seen by The Verge's Russell Brandom. The researchers investigated 34 different types of malware, tracking payments on the blockchain (the public, decentralised ledger of bitcoin transactions) to try and analyse the scale

7.25.17 CBS Los Angeles
"Victims Of Ransomware Attacks Have Paid $25 Million Last Two Years, Report Says"
Ransomware, the malware hackers use to lock victims' computers and demand money to unlock them, has garnered more than $25 million in payments for those responsible for deploying viruses in just the last two years, The Verge reports. A study on 34 separate cases of ransomware by researchers from Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering were able to better map out the ransomware underworld. Specifically, they discovered Locky, a strain of ransomware that has alone accrued more than $7 million in payments.

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