Skip to main content

Women in Engineering

Latest Stories Featuring Women

6/23/14
Students design and program bioreactor to make biofuel from algae, autonomous quadcopter-and more-in embedded systems class
A bioreactor that costs just $500. A robot that solves a Rubik’s cube in under 30 seconds. A quadcopter that flies around the room and avoids obstacles autonomously. These were just a few of the projects designed by students in the CSE 145 and 237 classes taught by computer science professor Ryan Kastner. The class’ goal is to teach students to build an embedded computing system. They learn the fundamentals of microcontrollers, such as Arduino and Beagle Bone Black, sensors and actuators. Students are also introduced to end-to-end system building and the hardware and software tools they will need to build a project in a team environment.
Full Story

New Star on Tijuana Walk of Fame Encourages Girls to Pursue Engineering 6/19/14
New Star on Tijuana Walk of Fame Encourages Girls to Pursue Engineering
One of the first initiatives Olivia Graeve put in place when she arrived on the UC San Diego campus last year was an academic summer program for female high school students from Tijuana and San Ysidro. The girls lived on campus and conducted research in engineering and biology labs. As a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering who specializes in materials science, she hopes to inspire more female students to follow her path. Graeve will be recognized for her scientific endeavors and her cross-border outreach efforts in July by being inducted in the Tijuana Walk of Fame.
Full Story

Outstanding Graduates from Class of 2014 Share Their Stories 6/18/14
Outstanding Graduates from Class of 2014 Share Their Stories
Engineering swept the outstanding student awards at this year's All Campus Graduation Celebration. Damini Tandon, a bioengineering major, was recognized as outstanding undergraduate student for her efforts to make health education and medical treatment accessible. Michael Porter, a Ph.D. student in the research group of materials science professor Joanna McKittrick, received the outstanding graduate student award for his academic achievements and his mentoring. 
Full Story

Nanoshell Shields Foreign Enzymes Used to Starve Cancer Cells from Immune System 6/16/14
Nanoshell Shields Foreign Enzymes Used to Starve Cancer Cells from Immune System
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a nanoshell to protect foreign enzymes used to starve cancer cells as part of chemotherapy. Their work is featured on the June 2014 cover of the journal Nano Letters.Enzymes are naturally smart machines that are responsible for many complex functions and chemical reactions in biology. However, despite their huge potential, their use in medicine has been limited by the immune system, which is designed to attack foreign intruders.
Full Story